Presentation

Working with a partner, you will be responsible for a presentation that explains to the class how a particular grammatical rule relates to a logical technique. Every presentation will be adding to and modifying our “Logic of Grammar” Digital Grammar Map, a prezi we will be using as a canvas on which we explore the relationships between logical form and grammatical practice. Each presentation must consist of three elements:

  1. an explanation of the grammatical rule and where it can be found in our Bedford Handbook
  2. an application of the grammatical rule to a given logical technique
  3. examples of this rule through its violation in student writing (these examples should include corrective revisions)
  4. reference to at least one previous presentation emphasizing a logical connection between them

You can draw examples of student writing from any student essay in our Forums, or you can specifically draw from the student writing in Forum section, "Student Writing."

Grading Rubric

An "A" presentations stays within its time limit. It communicates its information clearly and concisely. While using visual material, it does not rely on this material to communicate its message. Rather than read from her or his materials, a student uses visual aids as tools to prove or demonstrate a point. It fulfills all requirements of the assignment.

A "B" presentation stays mostly within its time limit and is neither too long nor too short. It communicates its information clearly and concisely. Such a presentation leans on its visual aids such that students tend to read from these materials, letting the presentation lead them rather than they the presentation. It fulfills the minimum requirements of the assignment.

A "C" presentation is not focused. It jumps from idea to idea with little connection forged between them. It is either too long or too short. In a "C" presentation, students mostly read from a script or their visual materials. It fulfills the minimum requirements of the assignment.

A "D" presentation does not meet the minimum requirements of the assignment. In a "D" presentation, the student rambles in an attempt to fill time. Visual material or either underdeveloped or lacking altogether.

An "F" presentation does not meet the time requirements, nor does it fulfill the minimum requirements of the assignment.

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